Mindsight is a cutting-edge model of treatment that capitalizes on neuroplasticity. It has been called the “New Science of Personal Transformation” (1). Neuroplasticity is defined as the ability to change the connections in your brain even through adulthood. A useful acronym is SNAG, by focusing our attention on the right area we are able to show you how to Stimulate Neural Activation and Growth in parts of the brain. Mindsight was developed by Daniel Siegel who was initially a Harvard trained physician and continued his work at UCLA under very well established attachment researchers.

The Mindsight model utilizes neuroplasticity to help you achieve, and achieve better mental health in every aspect of your life. It is also particularly significant in parenting (2) as it shows you how some types of parenting can build in your child an “optimized brain” that leads to resilience and high achievement (3).

 

We increased self-awareness and the right tools we can teach you how to sense if a particular emotional state or “thought” is emerging from the right or left sides of your brain. Is your thinking in that particular moment linear, linguistic, logical, literal, labeling and list-making and therefore dominated by the left hemisphere. Or, alternatively is it nonverbal, holistic, imagery-based, metaphoric, autobiographical, whole-body mapping and therefore right hemisphere dominant. Once you identify the areas where your thinking has become rigid or chaoti we can introduce the next level of intervention and nurture the development and neural activation and growth of those isolated regions (4)(5).

References:

1. Siegel, D.J. (2010). Mindsight: The new science of personal transformation. New York: Bantam.

2. Bryson, T.P. & Siegel, D.J. (2012). The whole-brain child. New York: Bantam.

3. Siegel D.J., & Harzell, M. (2003). Parenting from the inside out: How a deeper self-understanding can help you raise children who thrive. New York: Tarcher/Penguin

4. Siegel, D.J. (2010) The Mindful Therapist: A clinicians guide to mindsight and neuralintegration. New York: Norton.

5. Siegel D.J. (2001). Toward an interpersonal neurobiology of the developing mind: Attachment, “mindsight” and neural integration. Infant Mental Health Journal, 22, 67-94.